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Archive | February, 2019

The Omni-Channel Approach to Marketing

Old school marketing said to create a lot of written content and call it a day. And for a time, that worked really, really well. Fast forward to today, and written content is still great and it’s still needed, but it is not enough.

The Omni-Channel Approach to Marketing

You’ve also got to be doing podcasts, videos and live events; not only on your site, but on social media and also as a guest on other people’s shows and websites.

And while that might sound like a lot to do, consider this:

First, you write one long blog post.

Then from that blog post, you have enough information to do one or two short (5 to 10 minutes) podcasts. Yes, short podcasts work, and in fact they’re more likely to get listened to than long ones. When you do a short podcast, you cut straight to the heart of the matter, and that is what listeners want.

Also, from that same blog post, you can do a couple of videos and post those. And while you’re at it, you might have an infographic done, too.

Then maybe you do a Q and A on your site or social media.

Then you do some guest appearances on other people’s podcasts or live events, and so forth.

The information you offer in one really good blog post can be repurposed many times over and get you seen and heard all over the internet.

Good idea, right? This is exactly what some of the biggest people online are doing, which is why they’re big. They show up everywhere, they offer great info, and people really feel like they get to know them because they hear their voices or even see them in videos.

You might be thinking that people will get sick of you talking about the same info that’s already in your long blog post. But the people who read the blog post from start to finish are usually not the ones who listen to your podcasts, or the ones who watch you on video.

You’re expanding your reach and expanding your audience.

And if someone does read your post AND listen to your podcast AND watcs your live events or videos, do you think they will REMEMBER you?

That’s the point!

You’ve now made a lasting impression, and the next time they see your name on anything, they are much more likely to pay close attention to it.

If, right now, you’re only writing blog posts, don’t panic. Pick one thing – maybe podcasting – and learn how to do it. Then just start DOING it.

Yes, you might be terrible at first. That’s okay. If you’re really that bad, throw out the first few until you start to get the hang of it.

Once you master that channel, pick another one, and so forth.

It’s not about working harder – you don’t need original content for every single channel. It’s about working smarter.

Just as you would send out similar info on several different social media sites (perhaps letting people know about your latest blog post) so, too, you will be using similar info across these different marketing channels.

It’s what the most successful marketers are doing. And if they can learn how to do it, so can you.

Case Study: Set and Forget $2,850 a Month

First the disclaimer – your results will vary. Maybe greatly. I don’t have a clue. But what I’m about to share with you is definitely working for at least one individual, and he’s doing it simultaneously in 3 different niches, too.

Case Study: Set and Forget $2,850 a Month

This fellow (we’ll call him Joe) is a techie guy. He’s not a writer, he doesn’t consider himself to be a marketer, but he has latched onto a method that allows him to make money on autopilot, once he has his system set up.

Here’s how it works:

He chooses a niche. So far, he’s in weight loss, make money online and personal development. Actually, his niches are a little more targeted than that, but you get the idea. I have to keep some of this general so as to not step on his financial toes.

Once he’s chosen a niche, he goes digging for evergreen affiliate products that are a good fit. You can use products from any place you please, as long as those products are likely to be around for at least a few months or longer.

Depending on the niche, he chooses either 13 products or 26 products. Personally, I like 26 products, but it’s up to you.

Next, he hires someone to write emails for him – an entire year’s worth – to put in his autoresponder. Each week he promotes one of the products. Once he’s rotated through the list of products, he starts over with the first one again.

He’s sending out 3 emails each week, but you could do as many as you like. Of course, the more emails you have sent out, the more you’ll need to have written.

Or… if you’re good at writing, you can write your own emails. Yes, it takes time, but writing them in your own voice can be truly beneficial. That way if you decide to promote additional products to your list – for example, products that are only available for a short time – the emails will all be written in the same style.

Here’s what I would recommend: Either send out 5 or 7 emails a week via autoresponder and send nothing else to your list. This way you are truly hands off.

The emails should be a good mixture of content, sales, quotes, stories, observations, case studies and anything else that will interest your list.

Include a buy link in every email, even if it’s just in the P.S.

Once you have your emails ready to go in your autoresponder, you’ll need a big, fat, juicy lead magnet to attract tons of subscribers. For this, Joe likes to buy a course, have the entire thing rewritten and presented in an entirely new way (no plagiarism!) and give that away as his lead magnet.

His freebie is wonderful looking and so valuable, he gets over a 70% opt-in rate in 2 out of 3 of his niches. You’ll find your opt-in rates tend to be higher when you’re NOT in the internet marketing niche – hint hint.

Once you’ve got your squeeze page set up with your juicy lead magnet, it’s time to build your list. You can buy clicks from Facebook or where ever you like, but Joe buys all of his clicks from solo ads. Yes, it does take more digging to find solo ads outside of the online marketing niche, but they are available and totally worth it.

Joe spends less about $1,000 a month on solo ads, and he clears roughly $2,850 after expenses. This number is rising as more subscribers come onto his list.

Naturally, you can grow your list as fast or slow as you like, depending on how much money you’re willing to invest. But if you’re clearing $2.85 after expenses for each dollar you spend, wouldn’t you be sending a lot of traffic to your squeeze page? I would.

Notes:

1: You don’t have to write ALL of your emails ahead of time. If you stay one week ahead of your very first subscriber, you can write them throughout the year.

This way you can get started on list building sooner, and you’ll have plenty of incentive to keep writing those emails.

2: I’m using 1 year as an example because that’s how Joe set up his autoresponders, but there is no reason why you can’t continue to send out more emails beyond a year.

You can either write new emails promoting new products, or reuse your old emails. That’s right – send out the same year long sequence twice. Almost no one will ever notice.

I mean, think about it… do you remember the emails you got a YEAR ago? Not likely. You probably don’t even remember some of the products you bought a year ago.

3: There is some maintenance involved. You’ve got to check your links from time to time to make sure they still work. And of course, you’ve got to buy the solo ads or advertising.

4: This takes time to become profitable. You’ll be out of pocket for a bit. It took Joe several weeks to get into profit, but he did outsource his emails. If you write your own, it probably won’t take as long.

5: You could do this in as many niches as you like, as long as there are affiliate products to promote for that niche.

6: You can promote additional products to your lists. For example, if your friend Sue is doing a big launch of her new product that will only be available to two weeks, you might promote it to your list. Send those emails on the days when the autoresponder isn’t sending, or pause the autoresponder during this period of time.

7: Set your autoresponder to send out the emails a second time each day to those who didn’t open the first email. This little step can as much as double your income.

After all, not everyone will see your email the first time you send it out, so why not give them a second chance?

While there is nothing earth shattering or revolutionary about this method, it can work regardless of whether or not you’re a ‘marketer.’

Remember, Joe is a technical kind of guy. He doesn’t know much about marketing and doesn’t really want to learn marketing, either. He simply wanted some extra income, and that’s exactly what he’s got.

By outsourcing the writing to professionals if it’s not your cup of tea, you can still enjoy the profits of email marketing, and do it in a way that takes almost no time once you have it set up and running.

Proof is in the Pudding, and in Great Sales Copy (#1 Ingredient to Sell More Products)

Time and time again I see sales copy with one essential element that is completely missing in action. Any guesses as to what that might be?

It’s something that proves what you say is true. It’s the little thing that makes a believer out of a skeptic. Sometimes it’s off to the side, and sometimes it’s featured front and center. And the better it is, the more you need to show it off. It’s crucial for making sales.

Convinced

Have you guessed it?

It’s PROOF.

Proof that what you claim is true. Proof that your customers get the results you claim they will get. Proof that your product works. Proof that you won’t disappear in the night with your customer’s money.

It’s the difference from almost making a sale to MAKING the sale.

Here are seven different types of proof you can use in your copywriting, regardless of whether it’s an email, blogpost or sales page. Anytime you’re talking about your product, remember to include some proof.

1. Case studies – These are also known as customer success stories, and they tell a brief story about a customer who got results from your product or service.

For example, “Joe Smith uses this software, and in the first 30 days he saw a 22% increase in conversions.”

It’s best to keep your case studies short and concise, focusing on measurable results whenever you can. Remember, numbers are more persuasive than adjectives.

2. Testimonials – These are written statements from your customers or clients, explaining why they like your product or service. They’re typically quotes from people who’ve used your products or services.

The best testimonials don’t just sing your praises, they also explain details of why they customer endorses you or your product. For maximum impact, use testimonials that include numbers or quantitative results.

3. Endorsements – An endorsement is like a testimonial from someone widely recognized by your prospects.

If a well-known blogger or expert in your field endorses your product, by all means add this to your sales copy. People who trust this well-known individual will then trust your product by association.

4. Research studies – If there are any research studies that clearly show the effectiveness of your product or a component of your product, then use this data in your sales copy.

For example, if you sell an herbal supplement that contains 6 different ingredients, and the effectiveness of each ingredient is backed by research studies, you might include each study in your sales letter in the appropriate places.

The key here is to deliver the information concisely and in layman’s terms. Don’t use scientific lingo – you’ll lose your readers.

5. Visual representation of results – An image is truly worth a thousand words, if it’s the right image. You’re familiar with this technique from weight loss products. They use before and after photos of their clients to show the changes in their body sizes and shapes.

If you can use charts, photos, screenshots or other visuals to prove your product or service works, then by all means do it.

Place captions on your visuals. Studies show that captions are read more than almost any other element on a sales page (other than the headlines.)

Make your captions – well, captivating and self-explanatory. For example, a caption that says, “Janet Smith” doesn’t tell the prospect anything about the product. But the caption, “Janet Smith, after losing 42 pounds in 67 days on the XYZ diet” tells the whole story.

6. Press coverage – If you’ve received praise from a media outlet, then let your prospects know about it.

Quotes from well-known sources are best, since your home town paper might not hold much credibility with the rest of the world.

But if a well-known publication or media outlet has good things to say about your product or service, include that in your sales copy.

7. Social Shares – This is useful if you want to show you have a large audience.

For example, if you have a track record of writing blog posts that get thousands of social media shares, you might make the case that you are a trusted source for information in your field.

Next time you write any sort of copy that promotes a product or service, be sure to include at least one powerful element of proof in your copy.

Advanced technique: Use your proof as part of your headline or sub-headline.

For example, “Ex-Beautician Gets Four $100,000 Job Offers thanks to Our Job Getting System.”

I don’t know about you, but if I was in the market for a new job, I would be super excited to read that sales letter!

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